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Commented by Mario Hose on June 22nd, 2020 | 11:03 CEST

BMW, Daimler, Tesla, Volkswagen - Study proves big miscalculation for e-cars

  • E-cars

The renowned Kiel-based Institute for the World Economy (IfW) has published a study that is quite something. "Nowadays, electric cars run de facto on 100% coal-fired power," says IfW researcher Prof. Dr. Dr. Ulrich Schmidt, head of the Department of Social and Behavioral Economics Approaches to Solving Global Problems. "This is because the share of renewable energy in their electricity consumption is not available to displace fossil fuels elsewhere, and the increased demand for electricity requires the additional use of fossil fuels". Electric cars, which run on 100% carbon electricity and cause emissions of about 300 grams of CO2 per kilometer, whereas modern diesel vehicles emit only about 173 CO2 according to an ADAC study, cause considerable damage to the environment through the additional emission of greenhouse gases.

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Commented by Mario Hose on April 13th, 2020 | 11:03 CEST

BMW, Daimler, Volkswagen and dynaCERT - the cleanest diesel ever

  • Mobility

In a recent vehicle test, experts examined the BMW 520d, Mercedes-Benz GLE 350 and VW Golf 2.0 TDI models in city traffic, on country roads and autobahns. The magazine 'Auto, Motor und Sport' and the British testing specialist Emissions Analytics have tested the emission of nitrogen oxide (NOx) in road traffic under real conditions and the results are surprisingly good. The advantages of electric mobility are fading.

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Commented by Mario Hose on April 1st, 2020 | 10:32 CEST

Daimler, dynaCERT, Tesla, Volkswagen - Electromobility threatens setback

  • Mobility

The world stands still. Only a few vehicles are still rolling on the roads. Trucks supply the supermarkets with food and those who can, take their own car for shopping or for the way to work to avoid the risk of public transport becoming infected. However, most people currently spend most of their time at their home or home office, as it is now called. The exciting question these days is: when can the old normality finally start again? But there is also enormous uncertainty about the personal economic situation. Will your company or your employer manage to survive? The need to buy a new car in such a situation should be close to zero.

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Commented by Mario Hose on January 23rd, 2020 | 14:26 CET

TESLA - does a short squeeze like once at Volkswagen threaten?

  • Short squeeze

In the language of traders, the covering of short position in a rapidly rising market with a scarce supply is called short squeeze. So-called short sellers have previously borrowed shares from banks or other investors and then sold them because they wanted to bet on falling prices. If the share subsequently falls, the deal works out successfully. However, if the share rises, losses can occur when the position is closed out again so that the borrowed shares can be returned.

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Commented by Mario Hose on December 27th, 2019 | 07:20 CET

BMW, Daimler or Volkswagen - who gives up first?

  • Mobility

Ludwig Erhard, the second German Chancellor and economist, said in the 1950s the much-quoted sentence: "No state can give its citizens more than it has taken from them before". A conscientious government should therefore strive to keep the delta between tax revenue and benefit to the taxpayer as small as possible. In this context, government subsidies are always a sensitive issue. The economic sustainability of government support for technology and innovation must lead to industries and companies learning to stand on their own two feet and the market regulating demand. The solar industry in Germany is a prime example of how tax money can be wasted. No well-known German company in the solar industry has survived in competition with Asia. Is there any reason to worry that German electromobility will suffer a similar fate?

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Commented by Mario Hose on December 18th, 2019 | 10:36 CET

SAP, Siemens, Volkswagen, EXMceuticals - who has the best strategy for Africa?

  • Africa

The African continent is diverse and rich in people - more than just a beautiful travel destination. The population is estimated at around 1.3 billion people, which is comparable to China. The multitude of mineral resources and natural conditions offer an excellent starting position to strengthen the domestic economy and combat possible causes of flight. Various countries and companies have discovered Africa for themselves as a workbench, raw material region and sales market. However, sustainable stability and prosperity can usually only be achieved through education, and connection to that the different approaches of economy and politics can be of different importance for the local people.

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Commented by Mario Hose on December 9th, 2019 | 12:35 CET

BMW, Daimler, Volkswagen - GBC's buy recommendation for retrofitter dynaCERT

  • hydrogen

The German automotive industry is facing major challenges. Customers want vehicles with performance and range, but politicians have persuaded the industry to manufacture and market economical engines. What happens if the manufacturers' offerings do not meet the wishes and needs of the market? Nothing more and sales collapse. The consequences of this misguided policy will become visible in the coming years. The demand for new cars will decrease with further tightening of emission standards and the holding period of existing vehicles will increase. At the same time, the loss in value of vehicles with internal combustion engines is unlikely to remain as high. GBC Research today published an update on a study on an exciting retrofit with hydrogen technology for internal combustion engines, confirmed the buy recommendation and raised the price target.

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Commented by Juliane Zielonka on

Altech Advanced Materials, Volkswagen, FREYR Battery - Investment opportunity in the future energy storage market

  • Technology
  • Batteries
  • renewableenergies
  • Electromobility

The booming energy storage market will bring investments of USD 620 billion over the next 22 years, according to BloombergNEF. In this context, the focus shifts to Heidelberg-based Altech Advanced Materials AG, which specializes in emission-free energy storage solutions. Their innovative approach to generating energy from an abundant raw material in Europe - salt - is worth highlighting. Volkswagen is also striving for seamless supply in the electrification market and is re-sorting its semiconductor supply chains with the help of German taxpayer money. At Norway's FREYR Battery, quarterly results are in, surprising analysts.

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